[SSS pamflets 1-7 had, inside the front cover, progressively longer versions of "Some Opinions", sometimes in traditional spelling and sometimes in Nue Speling.]

Some Opinions.

The old fallacy that phonetic spelling destroys etymology and the history of the language is hardly consistent with the fact that all philological experts agree in regarding unphonetic spelling as a monstrous absurdity both from a scientific and from a practical point of view.
- Dr. HENRY SWEET.

Sum Opinyonz.

Dhe oeld falasy dhat fonetik speling destroiz etimolojy and dhe history ov dhe langgwej iz hardly konsistent widh dhe fakt dhat aul filolojikal eksperts agree in regarding unfonetic speling az a monstrus absurdity boeth from a sientifik and from a praktikal point ov vue.
- Dr. HENRY SWEET.

No one can possibly be in a position to judge as to the extent to which our spelling ought to be conformed (if at all) to that of Greek and Latin - for this is what supporters of the (so called) etymological spelling really mean - until he has first made himself acquainted with the history of our spelling and of our language. The plain question is simply this - how came we to spell as we do, and how is it that the written symbol so frequently gives a totally false impression of the true sound of the spoken word? Until this question has been more or less considered, it is impossible to concede that a student can know what he's talking about, or can have any right to be heard.  It is surely a national disgrace to us, to find that the wildest arguments concerning English spelling and etymology are constantly being used even by well educated persons, whose ignorance of the early English pronunciation and of modern English phonetics is so complete that they have no suspicion whatever of the amazing worthlessness of their ludicrous utterances.
- Professor W. W. SKEAT.

Noe wun kan posibly be in a pozishon to juj as to dhe ekstent to which our speling aut to be konformd (if at aul) to dhat ov Greek and Latin - for dhis iz whot sporterz ov dhe (soe kauld) etimolojikal speling realy meen - until he haz furst maed himself akwaented widh dhe history ov our speling and ov our langgwej. Dhe plaen kwestyon iz simply dhis - hou kaem we to spel az we duu, and hou iz it dhat dhe riten simbol so freekwently givz a toetaly fauls impreshon ov dhe truu sound ov dhe spoeken wurd? Until dhis kwestyon haz been mor or les konsiderd, it iz imposibl to konseed dhat a stuedent kan noe whot he iz tauking about, or kan hav eny riet to be hurd.  It iz shuurly a nashonal disgraes to us, to fiend dhat dhe wieldest arguements konsurning Inglish speling and etimolojy ar konstantly being uezd eeven bie wel eduekaeted pursonz, huuz ignorans ov urly Inglish pronunsyaeshon and ov modern Inglish fonetiks iz soe kompleet dhat dhae hav noe suspishon whotever ov dhe amaezing wurthlesnes ov dhaer luedikrus uteransezs.
- Professor W. W. SKEAT.

In the interests of etymology we ought to spell as we pronounce. To spell words as they used to be pronounced is not etymological but antiquarian.
- Professor W. W. SKEAT.

In dhe interests ov etimolojy we aut to spel az we pronouns. To spel wurdz az dhae uest to be pronounst iz not etimolojikal, but antikwaeryan.
- Professor W. W. SKEAT.

There is no argument against phonetic spelling but the argument of ridicule, which is merely, in this case, the appeal from reason to prejudice.
- HENRY LABOUCHERE.

Dhaer iz noe arguement agaenst fonetik speling but dhe arguement ov ridikuel, which iz meerly, in dhis kaes, dhe apeel from reezon to prejoodis.
- HENRY LABOUCHERE.

A poem certainly loses nothing in being well read or spoken. Only so can it attain to its real existence as poetry.  Yet when it is read or spoken, what becomes of the spelling and of the sentiment which is alleged to be more or less dependent on the spelling?
- Professor C. H. PAGE.

A poëm surtenly luuzez nuthing in being wel red or spoeken. Oenly soe kan it ataen to its real egzistens az poëtry. Yet when it iz red or spoeken, whot bekumz ov dhe speling and ov dhe sentiment which iz alejd to be mor or les dependent on dhe speling?
- Profesor C. H. PAGE.

He doth his native toung a good office, who finds a way to spread her abroad, and make her better known to the world.
- JAMES HOWELL, 1662.

He doth his native toung a good office, who finds a way to spread her abroad, and make her better known to the world.
- JAMES HOWELL, 1662.

In English I think we have got to a state of confusion that is really rather dangerous.  That is to say, that I do not think it an exaggeration when certain foreigners say to me, as they often do, "We can read English, but we do not attempt to speak it, because that is like learning another language..."

That is very important considering the vast world importance of the English language, and the great extent of ground over which it is spoken. We ought not to allow the path of the English language to be cumbered by such an enormous and unnecessary difficulty.
- Professor GILBERT MURRAY, 1926.

In Inglish I think we hav got to a staet ov konfuezhon dhat iz realy raadher daenjerus. Dhat iz to sae, dhat I duu not think it an egzajeraeshon when surten forrenerz sae to me, az dhae ofen duu, "We kan reed Inglish, but we duu not atempt to speek it, bekauz dhat iz liek lurning anudher langgwej;..."

Dhat iz very important konsidering dhe vaast wurld importans ov dhe Inglish langgwej, and dhe graet ekstent ov ground oever which it iz spoeken. We aut not to alou dhe paath ov dhe Inglish langgwej to be kumberd bie such an enormus and unnesesary difikulty.
- Profesor GILBERT MURRAY, 1926.

My Dictionary experience has already shown me that the ordinary appeals to etymology against spelling reform utterly break down upon examination.  The etymological information supposed to be enshrined in the current spelling is sapped at its very foundation by the fact that it is, in sober fact, oftener wrong than right, that it is oftener the fancies of pedants or sciologists of the Renascence, or monkish etymologers is still earlier times that are thus preserved than the truth which alone is ετυμολογια
- Sir JAMES MURRAY, 1888.

Mie Dikshonary ekspeeryens haz aulredy shoen me dhat dhe ordinary apeelz to etimolojy agaenst speling reform uterly braek doun upon egzaminaeshon. Dhe etimolojikal informaeshon supoezd to be enshriend in dhe kurrent speling iz sapt at its very foundaeshon bie dhe fakt dhat it iz, in soeber fakt, ofener rong dhan riet, dhat it iz ofener dhe fansiz ov pedants or siolists ov dhe Renasens, or munkish etimolojerz ov stil urlyer tiemz, dhat ar dhus prezurvd, dhan dhe truuth which aloen iz ετυμολογια
- Sur JAMES MURRAY, 1888.

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