On other pages part 1, part 2, part 3, part 5.

READING & SPELLING part 4.

HAVE YOU ORDERED YOUR COPY OF

"READING & SPELLING" YET?

SEE DETAILS BELOW.


THE READING & SPELLING SYMPOSIUM.

To be published soon by the Simplified Spelling Society by photographic reproduction. c. 200 pages. 8¼ x 11¾ (29.5cm. x 21cm.) Price £4.00 ($10.00) including postage. Orders to Publications Secretary, London.

This book is the first major publication in recent years of the Simplified Spelling Society. It is made up of a set of 28 papers presented at the First International Conference on Reading & Spelling of the Society.

It is truly international in scope. Papers were contributed from Britain, USA, Canada, Australia, Spain, Switzerland and Africa - Nigeria and The Gambia. All of the contributors as experts in their own fields - many of them are already acknowledged as such internationally.

One important piece of new research - the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language trials in The Gambia - is described by one of the investigators, Or. John Osanyinbi, Research Controller of the prestigious West African Examinations Council.

The remaining papers form an interesting miscellany on written communication through time and space. There is an informative account of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics from David Seton and also an interesting proposal for extending the use of hieroglyphics in the modern world by Prof. T. Hofmann. Other nations problems in representing their speech in writing are described by Prof. Daniels (Japanese), A.R.G. Burrows (Spanish) and Rolf Landolt (German). These allow us to see by comparison how relatively unlucky English speakers are. And, of course, there are the remedies - the reformed alphabets put forward by experimental orthographers.

There are also some valuable items by teachers who have had to take more orthodox roads out of the English spelling problem by adapting their teaching methods to the language as it stands.

There are in addition several thought provoking items on various aspects of the English language and its study. This book will be of both great interest to all those concerned with the language, whether as teachers or students.

THE READING & SPELLING SYMPOSIUM - CONTENTS.

Hieroglyphs of Ancient Egypt. David Deton.

Writing in Japanese. Prof. F.J. Daniels.

Ancient & Modern African Syllabaries. Geo. O'Halloran.

Sounds & Symbols in Spanish. A.R.G. Burrows.

Problems of Spelling in German. Rolf Landolt.

The Fixing of English Spelling. Dr. D. Scragg.

Speed-Writing Shorthand. Bryan Edwards.

The Possibilities of a Useful Pasigraphy. Prof. T. Hofmann.

Visual Methods of Teaching Reading. Geo. O'Halloran.

Phonic Methods of Teaching Reading. Beat. Tudor-Hart.

Chomsky's Theory, the English Orthography & Reading. Prof. J. Downing.

Spelling, Psychology & Colour Story Reading. Ken. Jones.

Regularised English and the Teaching of Reading. Prof. Axel Wijk.

Direct Methods in T.E.F.L.* Malang Barrow.

A Report on The Gambian Trial of TEFL*(Evaluating the Dynamic English Programme. Dr. J. Osanyinbi et al.

A Cross Cultural Study of English Language Competence. Dr. J. Osanyinbi.

Illiteracy: Is English Spelling a Significant Factor? Marjorie Chaplin.

The Essential Requirements for Reformed Spelling. Dr. W. Gassner.

Sensubul English Speling. Hugh Jamieson.

The Spel: An Alphabet & a Policy. (Late) Kingsley Read.

Phonology & Internal Open Juncture. Edward Smith.

Torskript. Vic. Paulsen.

Towards a Spelling Reform. Prof. A. Mazurkiewicz.

A Future Orthography balancing Sound & Sense. D. Masson.

Spelling & Parliament. W. Reed.

Light at the End of the Tunnel. Ed. Rondthaler.

Assistance to Spelling via Pronunciation. R. Cropper.


* Teaching English as a Foreign Language.


NOTE TO FUTURE CONTRIBUTORS.

To help future contributors who may wish to present phonetic material and who do not have the I.P.A. characters on their typewriters we provide below equivalents to I.P.A. in the form of the 1948 version of New Spelling. We have chosen the 1948 New Spelling because it uses only the characters of the normal keyboard and because other available similar scripts are not closely phonetic and need the use of diacritical marks to make them so.



EQUIVALENTS IN SYMBOLS OF THE
INTERNATIONAL PHONETIC ALPHABET.

J. Windsor Lewis.

 1948 New Spelling International Phonetic Alphabet Traditional Orthography
VOWELS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
see
sit
ten
hat
arm
got
sau
poot
tuu
kup
fur
agoe
paej
hoem
fiev
nou
join
neer
haer
puer
si
sɪt
ten
læt
ɑm
got

pʊt
tu
kʌp
fɜ(r)
ǝgǝʊ
peɪdʒ
hǝʊm
fɑɪv
nɑʊ
dʒɔɪn
nɪǝ(r)
heǝ(r)
pjʊǝ(r)
see
sit
ten
hat
arm
got
saw
put
too
cup
fur
ago
page
hone
five
now
join
near
hair
pure

 1948 New Spelling International Phonetic Alphabet Traditional Orthography
CONSONANTS
1.
2.
3.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
pen
bad
tee
kat
get
chin
Juun
faul
vois
thin
dhen
soe
zuu
ship
vizhon
hou
man
noe
sing
leg
red
yes
wet
pen
bæd
ti
læt
get
tʃɪn
dʒun
fɔl
vɔɪs
θɪn
ðen
sǝʊ
zu
ʃɪp
vɪʒn
hɑʊ
mæn
nǝʊ
sɪŋ
leg
red
jes
wet
pen
bad
tea
cat
get
chin
June
fall
voice
thin
then
so
zoo
ship
vision
how
man
no
sing
leg
red
yes
wet




BOOK REVIEWS.

BIRDS:

 Oxford University Press, 6½ x 8½ Hardcover, 23 pages. An interesting book suitable for top juniors and early seniors. A sufficient number of native birds in included to provoke children into, at least, noticing them. There is a map of migrations on the inside cover.

THE RED STORY HOUSE:

 Oxford University Press, 6½ x 8½, flexible cover, 96 pages. Suitable for 9-11 year olds, and perhaps lower or backward seniors. A miscellany of stories, verse and oddments.

A SUDDEN LINE:

 Oxford University Press, 6½ x 8½, flexible cover, 23 pages, price 0.95p. A volume of verse which many children will enjoy; some may even learn 'by heart' some of the poems. It is, on the whole, a good selection of modern and rather older (early 1900s) material. For some schools (and parents) it is rather spoiled by the inclusion of a few words: 'ass' in the anatomical sense and 'shit' in the physical sense.

ALPHABETS FOR ENGLISH:

  Ed. W. Haas, Manchester University Press, 5½ x 8¾, £2.50. Boards, 120 pages. This is not a new book but ought to be noticed in this journal. It is made up of a first chapter by Prof. Haas on spelling and spelling reform. This is followed by a paper by Sir James Pitman with the cumbersome title 'The late Dr. Mont Follick - An Appraisal. The Assault on the Conventional Alphabets and Spelling', which is largely a plug for Pitman and i.t.a. There is an interesting account by Prof. Axel Wijk of his 'Regularised English'. Peter MacCarthy's paper on New Spelling is well worth the price of the book alone. His piece on the G.B. Shaw alphabet (which was composed by the late Kingsley Read) will satisfy a kind of nostalgia for older days. It is also a scholarly piece of work. I wonder why every alphabeteer puts the Gettysburg address into his system? There is a short index.

PHONOGRAPHIC TRANSLATION:

  W. Haas, Manchester University Press, 5½ x 8¾, c.100 pages, Board cover, good index and bibliography. This is not an easy book for those without training in phonetics but there are adequate explanations and, if one persists, it can be rewarding.

THE CASE FOR SPELLING REFORM:

  late Dr. Mont Follick, M.P., Manchester University Press, 5½ x 8¾, 330 pages, board cover. A very interesting work by the man who very nearly saw spelling reform in his own lifetime. It is a mine of information for all of those interested in English spelling, its origins and curiosities. There is a great deal also of information about spelling reformers and their sometimes strange activities. Did you know, for example, that the first spelling reformer was a gentleman called Ormin who lived in the 13th century? The book, unfortunately, has no index.

(Signed reviews are welcome for future issues).



COMPETITION 1: The Silent Alphabet.

Almost every letter in the English alphabet is sometimes used in a situation where it is not pronounced at all, e.g. thumb. We should like our readers to send us as nearly complete a silent alphabet as they can giving one word to illustrate each silent letter. Foreign words with extensive use in English are acceptable.

Address the envelope to Competition 1. The best complete solution received will be winner. The winner's name will be published in our next number. There is a prize of £2.00 to the solution opened first. The editor's decision is final.


HELP US: HELP YOURSELF!

by advertising your goods and services;

situations vacant and required; books & courses;

in READING & SPELLING

Etcetara, Etcetara, Etcetara!





LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

Syllabic /l/.

The first step in simplifying the relationship between spoken and written English is to establish how the language is spoken. One aspect of pronunciation needing investigation is the phonetic contexts in which a contrast between syllabic and non-syllabic /l/ survives.

Several good dictionaries, the most recent being C.T. Onions' Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology, show a contrast of syllabic and non-syllabic /l/ in the following pairs:

A
maple
principle
apple
pabble
bible
thimble
bugle
eagle
A'
papal
principal
chapel
rebel
libel
symbol
frugal
legal
B
candle
little
title
apostle
nestle
coddle
idle
B'
scandal
acquittal
vital
colossal
vessel
model
idol

In his English Pronouncing Dictionary Daniel Jones recorded such a contrast is optional in Received Pronunciations for the pairs in columns A:A' where the contrast follows labial and velar consonants, but not for the pairs in columns B:B', where alveolar consonants precede the contrast. From my own observations I cannot confirm the existence of any spoken English in which the word pairs in columns B:B' fail to rime. I should like to hear from anybody who has observed a contrast in these pairs.

Edward Smith, Beckenham, Kent.


DO NOT FORGET TO KEEP OPEN

THE LAST FULL WEEK IN AUGUST 1977

FOR THE SECOND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE.



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